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Skipping the Flu Shot Can Lead to Dire Consequences in People with COPD

The flu is a major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, or flare-ups, which worsen coughing and breathing problems. Research showing the dire consequences of the flu in COPD patients underscores why it’s so important for people with the condition to get an annual flu vaccine. This year, getting an annual flu shot is…

The Link Between Excess Weight and Prostate Cancer

Obesity—defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more— is known to increase the risk of some types of cancer as well as cancer deaths. It is unclear whether obesity influences the development of prostate cancer specifically. However, other links between obesity and prostate cancer have been reported.

Making Sense of MRI Results

If you’ve undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for lower back pain and the results show up in your online medical records before your doctor explains them, you may find the report to be confusing and even alarming. Most patients do, according to a study in the American Journal of Radiology. Here’s what you should do if…

Why Is Depression So Common Among People with Dementia?

Why is depression so common among people with dementia? Some studies have found that people with depression have a heightened risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other forms of dementia. Others theorize that depression may be an early symptom of AD and other forms of dementia. Still others suggest that some common biological phenomenon, such as…

Goal Perseverance and Optimism Linked to Lower Depression, Anxiety Risk

People who don’t give up on their goals—or who get better at not giving up over time— appear to have less anxiety and depression and fewer panic attacks, according to a study of thousands of Americans over the course of 18 years. Not surprisingly, having a positive outlook was also beneficial.

7 Steps You Can Take to Manage—or Prevent—AFib

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) causes the heart to beat erratically and increases the risk for a stroke or heart failure. If you have (AFib), making a few changes to your daily routine, in addition to medication and, when needed, certain medical procedures, could be useful in the management of the condition. In a recent scientific statement published…

Walking: An Easy Way to Stay Fit During the Covid-19 Pandemic

Of all the ways to stay fit, walking is the easiest and safest. Even walking outside is fine as long as you follow coronavirus safety precautions. Many studies in people with a variety of conditions, notably heart disease, diabetes, and prostate or breast cancer, have linked walking (and physical activity in general) with better health outcomes.…

BPH Triggers and Treatment Options

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), also known as an enlarged prostate, is the most common benign (noncancerous) growth process in men. What triggers BPH is not well understood, but aging and testosterone (the predominant male sex hormone) are believed to be the primary influences on its development. Treatment for the condition is necessary only if symptoms begin…

What Causes Color Blindness?

More accurately called color vision deficiency, color blindness is the inability to distinguish colors, most often shades of red and green. Only rarely does a person not see any color at all. In most, but not all cases, the condition is hereditary. While there is no cure for inherited color vision deficiency, some people learn to…

Long-Term Use of Some Medications Linked to Dementia

Certain drugs that have a strong anticholinergic effect have been associated with an increased risk of dementia in older adults who use them long term, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine. Anticholinergics block a chemical messenger (acetylcholine) involved in the transmission of nerve impulses in the brain.